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French New Wave: Viva Le Style!

In the 60s while Britain and America celebrated the female figure through bold colour, shortened hemlines and dresses and girdles that were more to impress your husband than to make you comfortable, France had the New Wave.  Sure the cinema style itself was impeccable, sexy and confident, but so was the clothing.  With a lack of self-consciousness, women looked devastatingly sexy and strong.   The key pieces that were first seen in films like Jules  et Jim or Breathless are still seen as staples of a stylish wardrobe even today.

How To Do It

Don’t over do it otherwise you will look like you’re in costume.

Think androgynous but with make-up, masculine trousers, white shirts and flawless hair.

Sexy but minimalist goes a long way.  A sleek black pencil skirt or shift dress that hugs the figure but reveals only a little.

Hold a cigarette in your mouth but let it drop nonchalantly.

Try the famous striped t-shirt but maybe in different colours – pink and black, say, otherwise you might as well go the whole hog with beret and string of onions.

Walk around with a sense of existential desolation – read Sartre to help achieve this effect.

http://www.newwavefilm.com/ For more inspiration.

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This entry was posted on October 29, 2010 by in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , .

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Copyright: Elizabeth Watkin

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